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> What I am reading and what are you?
gunug
post Mar 22 2017, 10:58 AM
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I just finished a couple of volumes by Victoria N.Kneubuhl, that are murder mysteries set in 1930's Hawaii. They're told very smoothly and
from a very nice perspective of a set of twins that are very much in the action. I've now read "Murder Casts A Shadow" and "Murder Leaves Its Mark"
and I'm looking forward to more when they come out!

Also started in on An Anthropology of Landscape which is a cultural anthropology study of the Peeblebed Heathlands in the area of Britain near Exeter. I
started out in the 1970's with an interest in Anthropology and even worked for that department as a student employee. I determined I didn't have the
stomach for the academics but still I enjoyed the studies. This is a pretty detailed research into the ways people interact in this area and involves all parts
of the society there. Not too horribly academic! You can download it here:

http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1537609/1/An-An...f-Landscape.pdf


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RNKIII
post Mar 22 2017, 11:48 AM
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Just finished "The Last Days of Night", a historical/fiction about the battles, legal and otherwise, between Edison, Westinghouse, and Tesla. To spread electricity throughout the country in the late 1800s. Very well written from the point of view of Westinghouse' young genius lawyer. Excellent story, without getting bogged down in scientific detail.

Bob K. rnkiii
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gunug
post Mar 23 2017, 12:19 PM
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How much of the book is fictional? Are they just bridging over things that aren't really documented or are they just plain making things up?


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RNKIII
post Mar 23 2017, 01:30 PM
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Bridging between very well documented 'battles '... court records, newspaper articles, and in some cases, diaries. But written , combined, very well.

Bob K. rnkiii
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kimmer
post Mar 23 2017, 02:35 PM
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My current books are:

Killing the Rising Sun by Bill O'Reilly
Anxious for Nothing by John MacArthur

When I need "lighter" reading, I switch over to Fly By Night by Ward Larsen.


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Xairbusdriver
post Mar 23 2017, 05:15 PM
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My "understanding" is that Edison was often unconcerned about legalities and sometimes facts. Tesla was even less interested in those things and "gave away the store" once too often. Westinghouse had the backing and the money that came with that.

"Fly By Night"?! I resemble that! rant.gif

I recently read two different books having lots of info about an old High School classmate for whom I had little respect back then. Fortunately, he made a name for himself in 'Nam by earning a Silver Star, one of 17 given for courage and perseverance in an early battle. The first was basically a compilation of 'battle reports', very 'matter-of-fact' and detail oriented. The second went into the history and early lives of many of the US combatants. Frankly, very few of these fellows had lived long enough to have much more than "early lives". wink.gif But it made the events much more realistic and included many interviews with the men involved. As they say, war will either make you an adult or kill you. He eventually retired as a full Colonel and is now a pastor of a small congregation in GA. He's still married to the young lady he met just six months before leaving for Viet Nam!

I'm thinking about reading the book by Chip and Joanna Gaines. I don't read without lots of thought and planning! I fear reading something that might change my 70+ year old attitude! laughhard.gif


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tacit
post Mar 31 2017, 09:47 PM
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I'm currently in the middle of The Lucifer Effect by Philip Zimbardo, the psychologist responsible for the infamous Stanford Prison Experiment. It's about how decent, civilized, law-abiding people with ordinary, everyday backgrounds can become absolute monsters capable of the most depraved acts of atrocity when placed in an environment that dehumanizes other people...and how incredibly rapidly it happens. (It took just six days for the Stanford Prison Experiment to turn ordinary college grad students into monsters.)

It's heavy reading, but very important, especially now.


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gunug
post Apr 3 2017, 07:54 AM
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Back when I was in school (1970's) there was a lot of interest in the Milgram Experiment at Yale:

QUOTE
The Milgram experiment on obedience to authority figures was a series of social psychology experiments conducted by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. They measured the willingness of study participants, men from a diverse range of occupations with varying levels of education, to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts conflicting with their personal conscience; the experiment found, unexpectedly, that a very high proportion of people were prepared to obey, albeit unwillingly, even if apparently causing serious injury and distress. Milgram first described his research in 1963 in an article published in the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology[1] and later discussed his findings in greater depth in his 1974 book, Obedience to Authority: An Experimental View.[2]

The experiments began in July 1961, in the basement of Linsly-Chittenden Hall at Yale University,[3] three months after the start of the trial of German Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem. Milgram devised his psychological study to answer the popular question at that particular time: "Could it be that Eichmann and his million accomplices in the Holocaust were just following orders? Could we call them all accomplices?"[4] The experiments have been repeated many times in the following years with consistent results within differing societies, although not with the same percentages around the globe.
-https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milgram_experiment


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gunug
post Apr 10 2017, 09:39 AM
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Currently reading back through some Aaron Elkins "skeleton detective" books online and in print; I read them so long ago I don't recall the who that dun it anymore! Wish he'd
have written some more or that the series had lasted longer than one season on network television!


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Frances144
post Apr 19 2017, 09:04 AM
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There be dragons!


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The best book series ever!

The Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch - (audiobooks)

The second best book series ever!

The Shardlake Series by C J Sansom - Radio 4 plays
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RNKIII
post Apr 19 2017, 09:22 AM
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Agree on the Aaronovitch series, think Neil will also agree... one needs a little 'magic' in ones life... Very good reads...need to read in sequence for best follow through.


Bob K. rnkiii
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gunug
post Apr 20 2017, 12:40 PM
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Just started in on The Chernobyl Herbarium: Fragments of an Exploded Consciousness
by Michael Marder and Ana´s Tondeur

This is a collection of musings, not poetry, more prose about what's happening with the environment
that was left behind by the meltdown of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. They have photograms of
plants as chapter headings; these show the actual residual radioactivity of the plants themselves. It's
short, it's free to download as a PDF, and it's free; worth a read!

http://www.openhumanitiespress.org/books/t...obyl-herbarium/


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Xairbusdriver
post Apr 20 2017, 01:51 PM
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Patience is for humans!


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As the folks on some sites would say, "How much does it cost?" laughhard.gif

Might DL that myself. It's quite amazing how the flora and fauna seem to be coping with the radioactivity very well with little longterm effects. It appears humans are the most affected by this human-created problem. Sound fair to me!


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without having its motives questioned.

Signals, holiday 2014
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